Sub-station

instead of dyeing easter eggs, try découpageinstead of dyeing easter eggs, try découpageinstead of dyeing easter eggs, try découpage

by:HKKYO     2019-12-23
CONCORD, N. H. —
When it comes to Easter eggs, it is OK to dip them into the dye, but for more decorative and longer --
Try d. Coupage for lasting results.
This is my opinion of the three methods I have tried;
Rating based on 1 ratio (worst)to 10 (best).
This tutorial is from a blog called \"SewforSoul (
And published in the journal love.
Although this is the most time
The consumer technology I tried, it produced the most impressive results.
To make these eggs, the small note is glued to the plastic egg as the bottom layer of the hidden colored plastic.
Once the layer is dry, the eggs rub it with the back of the spoon to smooth out any rough edges.
The eggs were then covered with small notes torn from old books, randomly overlapping the notes until the eggs were completely covered.
More drying and polishing, then the extra design cut off from the paper towel is glued to the egg.
A wash of water
Down the craft paint gives the egg a distressed, antique look.
The original version of this method features blackand-
White pictures, but I used napkins with color illustrations of Peter Rabbit to illuminate them.
I like the soft, shabby, chic effects.
Cost: 7 Easy: 5 results: 9 napkins and the website of Martha Stewart (
It has a variety of techniques for decorating eggs, including real eggs and decorative paper towels.
To try this, pierce the hole at both ends of the egg and blow the inside out.
Cut the pattern from the paper towel
I chose a floral pattern.
Separate these layers and use only one layer of organization.
Apply d. Coupage glue on the egg and paste the pattern and cover the whole egg with glue.
This technique is cheap, especially when you use eggs as breakfast, it will produce very beautiful and elegant results.
However, the real eggs are fragile
I opened a hole trying to expand one of them.
So this method is not the best for kids.
Cost: 8 easy: 7 results: found this technique on craft \'n coffee (
A blog created by companies that produce foam plastic brand foam craft products.
The foam eggs I bought are much more expensive than the plastic or real eggs used in other items, although I have scrap fabric on hand and the price will be higher if I buy this fabric.
The fabric is cut into inches for this item
Wide strips, then trimmed into triangles.
The eggs are covered in pieces by glue, and the fabric is glued to it in a random, overlapping manner.
The last layer of decorative glue on the edge.
I found this method rather picky.
Some fabric keeps falling off when I manipulate the eggs
It\'s hard for me to level them.
The result is a bit too bumpy and rustic-
Looking for my taste.
On the other hand, the use of foam means that eggs can easily be worn on Baker\'s hemp rope to make garlands.
Because the eggs and fabrics are fairly solid compared to the paper or real eggs used in other methods, this is a much easier way for children to try.
Cost: 4 easy: 4 results: 6 related pressure, NH. —
When it comes to Easter eggs, it is OK to dip them into the dye, but for more decorative and longer --
Try d. Coupage for lasting results.
This is my opinion of the three methods I have tried;
Rating based on 1 ratio (worst)to 10 (best).
This tutorial is from a blog called \"SewforSoul (
And published in the journal love.
Although this is the most time
The consumer technology I tried, it produced the most impressive results.
To make these eggs, the small note is glued to the plastic egg as the bottom layer of the hidden colored plastic.
Once the layer is dry, the eggs rub it with the back of the spoon to smooth out any rough edges.
The eggs were then covered with small notes torn from old books, randomly overlapping the notes until the eggs were completely covered.
More drying and polishing, then the extra design cut off from the paper towel is glued to the egg.
A wash of water
Down the craft paint gives the egg a distressed, antique look.
The original version of this method features blackand-
White pictures, but I used napkins with color illustrations of Peter Rabbit to illuminate them.
I like the soft, shabby, chic effects.
Cost: 7 Easy: 5 results: 9 napkins and the website of Martha Stewart (
It has a variety of techniques for decorating eggs, including real eggs and decorative paper towels.
To try this, pierce the hole at both ends of the egg and blow the inside out.
Cut the pattern from the paper towel
I chose a floral pattern.
Separate these layers and use only one layer of organization.
Apply d. Coupage glue on the egg and paste the pattern and cover the whole egg with glue.
This technique is cheap, especially when you use eggs as breakfast, it will produce very beautiful and elegant results.
However, the real eggs are fragile
I opened a hole trying to expand one of them.
So this method is not the best for kids.
Cost: 8 easy: 7 results: found this technique on craft \'n coffee (
A blog created by companies that produce foam plastic brand foam craft products.
The foam eggs I bought are much more expensive than the plastic or real eggs used in other items, although I have scrap fabric on hand and the price will be higher if I buy this fabric.
The fabric is cut into inches for this item
Wide strips, then trimmed into triangles.
The eggs are covered in pieces by glue, and the fabric is glued to it in a random, overlapping manner.
The last layer of decorative glue on the edge.
I found this method rather picky.
Some fabric keeps falling off when I manipulate the eggs
It\'s hard for me to level them.
The result is a bit too bumpy and rustic-
Looking for my taste.
On the other hand, the use of foam means that eggs can easily be worn on Baker\'s hemp rope to make garlands.
Because the eggs and fabrics are fairly solid compared to the paper or real eggs used in other methods, this is a much easier way for children to try.
Cost: 4 easy: 4 results: 6 related pressure, NH. —
When it comes to Easter eggs, it is OK to dip them into the dye, but for more decorative and longer --
Try d. Coupage for lasting results.
This is my opinion of the three methods I have tried;
Rating based on 1 ratio (worst)to 10 (best).
This tutorial is from a blog called \"SewforSoul (
And published in the journal love.
Although this is the most time
The consumer technology I tried, it produced the most impressive results.
To make these eggs, the small note is glued to the plastic egg as the bottom layer of the hidden colored plastic.
Once the layer is dry, the eggs rub it with the back of the spoon to smooth out any rough edges.
The eggs were then covered with small notes torn from old books, randomly overlapping the notes until the eggs were completely covered.
More drying and polishing, then the extra design cut off from the paper towel is glued to the egg.
A wash of water
Down the craft paint gives the egg a distressed, antique look.
The original version of this method features blackand-
White pictures, but I used napkins with color illustrations of Peter Rabbit to illuminate them.
I like the soft, shabby, chic effects.
Cost: 7 Easy: 5 results: 9 napkins and the website of Martha Stewart (
It has a variety of techniques for decorating eggs, including real eggs and decorative paper towels.
To try this, pierce the hole at both ends of the egg and blow the inside out.
Cut the pattern from the paper towel
I chose a floral pattern.
Separate these layers and use only one layer of organization.
Apply d. Coupage glue on the egg and paste the pattern and cover the whole egg with glue.
This technique is cheap, especially when you use eggs as breakfast, it will produce very beautiful and elegant results.
However, the real eggs are fragile
I opened a hole trying to expand one of them.
So this method is not the best for kids.
Cost: 8 easy: 7 results: found this technique on craft \'n coffee (
A blog created by companies that produce foam plastic brand foam craft products.
The foam eggs I bought are much more expensive than the plastic or real eggs used in other items, although I have scrap fabric on hand and the price will be higher if I buy this fabric.
The fabric is cut into inches for this item
Wide strips, then trimmed into triangles.
The eggs are covered in pieces by glue, and the fabric is glued to it in a random, overlapping manner.
The last layer of decorative glue on the edge.
I found this method rather picky.
Some fabric keeps falling off when I manipulate the eggs
It\'s hard for me to level them.
The result is a bit too bumpy and rustic-
Looking for my taste.
On the other hand, the use of foam means that eggs can easily be worn on Baker\'s hemp rope to make garlands.
Because the eggs and fabrics are fairly solid compared to the paper or real eggs used in other methods, this is a much easier way for children to try.
Custom message
Chat Online 编辑模式下无法使用
Chat Online inputting...